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APRIL 2014

Powell River Living

Is Powell River hip? Our research revealed that not only is it currently hip, and trending up, but it also has a history of hip dating back to the town’s original establishment. Find out what made Powell River hip in the past, and who’s making it hip today in our feature story by Pieta Woolley.

What makes young athletes go the extra mile to compete at the elite level? And what makes their parents support and pay for their many road trips? Isabelle Southcott asked a few local families why they go to all the effort.

Easter is coming. Chocolate will follow. Will it survive? Not according to Lynn McCann, who shares her darkest chocolate secrets.

We begin a series catching up with former Powell Riverites who’ve made a name for themselves outside this burg. Brilliantly titled “Where Are They Now?”, this month’s edition checks in with Arwen Widmer, now a diplomat in Mexico City.

Our “I Made the Move” feature, introducing you to people who moved to Powell River gets personal with Shane Bodie, the force behind Studio 56 in the Townsite.

Townsite Heritage Society has a new executive director. What makes Linda Nailer love the Townsite? Find out on Page 18.

A new local rewards program has been kicked off, following up on the successes of the Sustainability Stakeholders program, and taking it further. Learn about Local Logic on Page 29, then sign up here.

Of course, there’s much more, but you’ll have to find a paper copy, or download it here or view it here.

 

MARCH 2014

Powell River LivingMarch’s issue goes deep, exploring the inner thoughts of some of Powell River’s leading women, as well as the story behind Powell River’s underwater mermaid statue.

The cover image of the March issue of Powell River Living was taken by Doug Pemberton.

As the Powell River Kings head into the playoffs, we featured an interview with their play-by-play man, Alex Rawnsley. As far as we know, he’s the only play-by-play announcer in the country with an Australian accent.

The local school district featured each of its schools in a special section, where you can learn what’s happening, and how it’s preparing youth for the future.

Our ongoing “I Made the Move” feature introduces readers to Ben Crawford and Katie Kinsley, and how a camping trip here turned them into full-time residents.

Two Wildwood artists, who also happen to be a couple, and a sample of their art, are featured. Check out Debbie Dan’s beautiful painting, and Rod Innes’ lovely hummingbird photo.

Is there a wedding in your future? Consider holding it in Powell River’s historic Townsite. We share a bunch of reasons why. We also share a romantic story and some great photos from a recent surprise engagement.

If you’ve read this far, you probably agree that Powell River is the centre of the universe. Jennifer Salisbury explains how she has come to that conclusion after meeting people connected to Powell River during her trips to various destinations.

In honour of International Women’s Day, Powell River Living profiled 31 local women. Get introduced beginning on Page 29 of this issue.

March marked the return of horticulturist Jonathan van Wiltenburg’s “A Growing Concern” column. In it, he discusses how to tackle all those gardening tasks, without killing yourself in the process.

Miriam Abrams shares her first close-up of death in a heartwarming and heartbreaking story of an adopted little bird.

Don’t forget to check out what’s going on around town in our What’s Up and Community Calendar sections.

 

FEBRUARY 2014

Powell River LivingFebruary’s issue highlights how connected Powell River is to the rest of the world.

Interested in the Sochi Olympics? The legs gracing the cover of the February issue of Powell River Living are just a hint. Read high heels and hockey skates to find out more.

For the first time ever, a reporter asked famed BC politicos (and local sheep farmers) Judi Tyabji-Wilson and Gordon Wilson about their true romance — the one that made headlines more than 20 years ago. That reporter is Isabelle Southcott. Get ready for Valentines Day here.

Joining protests throughout BC’s coast, more than one thousand locals came together here to protest the cuts to BC Ferries in January; find a photo spread capturing the fury on Page 22.

Many Syrian refugees in Lebanon are experiencing a freezing winter in tents. Local realtor Kathie Mack has a daughter working as a United Nations field officer in Lebanon, and asked Powell River locals to knit toques for babies. See the remarkable response here.

Closer to home, inspire your Valentine’s Day by reading about senior love-birds John and Wendy; the camera club makes winter look good; Karen Southern published a new book about Townsite history for Heritage Week; Capt. Hal Ross retired from the Coast Guard.

Finally, and sadly, Ruby Duck passed away this month. The famous Muscovy duck spent the past year bringing delight to Facebook readers here and abroad.

Happy February, all.

 

 WINTER LIVING 2014

Powell River LivingPowell River backcountry adventurers head back down the hill after a day in the Knuckleheads Winter Recreation Area in the cover photo for this year’s edition of Winter Living. The sunset shot is by Tobias Ulrich. Elsewhere in BC, commercial mountains have suffered with a lack of snow, but here in Powell River, the Knuckleheads is a playground for snowboarders, snowshoers, cross-country skiers, tobogganers and power sledders.

Local writer Malina Hopkins rounded up four talented local visual artists to share their vision of winter in the rainforest. Check out their great art beginning on Page 5.

Hiking is more fun in the winter than it sounds, thanks to lowland snow-free trails and high-country cabins.

Meanwhile, underwater, Powell River Living’s own Sean Percy braved the cold depths to photograph the eclectic variety of sea stars that call the Salish Sea home. Some of them seem to be melting. No kidding, melting.

Still feeling lethargic? But not ready to dunk yourself in the salt chuck? Our annual winter roundup of things to do in the rainy season will get you off the couch. No drysuit required.

For some people, getting off the couch seems a herculean task, thanks to winter’s depressing effects. Counsellor Rick Berghauser offers his expertise on how to handle Season Affective Disorder on Page 27.

One of the hippest places in Powell River on a winter Saturday morning is the Winter Market on Joyce Avenue. Get to know the market with our photo feature on Page 30.

Our “Townsite’s Where It’s At” feature looks at the History Afloat, the theme of Heritage Week Feb 17-23. From steamships to log barges, the coastal waterway was the lifeblood of this community for decades – long before highways were built here or BC Ferries started ticking off local residents.

Everyone has a story about home renovations, and we want to read yours. So we’re having a contest! Send us your dream or nightmare – maximum 500 words plus a photo, if you have one. Deadline is March 7. Send your stories to isabelle@prliving.ca. Need inspiration, see Isabelle Southcott’s personal story on Page 36.

Winter Living is produced once a year in January.

 

Powell River Living magazine is published 11 months a year by Southcott Communications. Paper copies are available at most businesses in Powell River, at grocery store and mall racks, and at our office on Glacier Street. Online, you can find it here via issuu.com (click the “Current Issue” tab above), or as a PDF download (click the “Archives” tab).